Monday, September 7, 2015

Come As You Are

Sometimes the lighting is never right 


and the pictures will never show what you see everyday.


They will always be too dark, too light, or full of garden clutter.


But so what. Does it really matter?


Nope.


73 comments:

  1. Everything looks lovely to me Tammy and your last photo is gorgeous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! It took a lot of blurry shots to get that one!

      Delete
  2. I think they look lovely - it's a really happy composition

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. Happy plantings are the best. :o)

      Delete
  3. And we are all so biased anyway, both for good and for ill, about our own homes....what matters is that we SHARE. Bless the bloggers! We do share.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the sense of community that blogging gives. All that sharing has made me a better gardener. :o)

      Delete
  4. It's so hard to see the beauty in our own gardens. Sometimes we're just too critical. I haven't shown much of my own garden lately. I'm just so sick of trying to make sure my pictures are framed or cropped so as to not show the bad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know how you feel. I keep thinking I have to redesign everything so it's picture perfect but the pollinators are thrilled that I let the wild asters take over.

      Delete
  5. Tammy we should all be easier on ourselves about our gardens and our pictures ... another "do as I say, not what I do " ?? haha
    I really love that last picture ... what is that plant ?
    Joy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am definitely too hard on myself when it comes to my garden. The last pic is of talinum 'Jewels of Opar'. It's very easy to grow from seed and has really cool little flower balls that pop open to reveal those pink flowers. I really like it.

      Delete
  6. PS ... I see you have one of the Kodiak shrubs going in ... I am looking for Kodiak Orange (where I would put it is another story)
    I also read that "red" blurb on the sidebar and had a great laugh because that is what I do too ... glad I am not alone ! LOL
    Joy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have no problem admitting my mistakes. No one's perfect. I love the Kodiak Black. I stuck it in a really tough spot and it's doing well.

      Delete
  7. All of your photos and the gardens vignettes they showcase are just what they should be--beautiful and real. And that last photo? Stunning!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Real is all you'll ever get on my blog. :o)

      Delete
  8. So true, but it is the minds eye that counts, as we can edit all we like in our mind, and there it is perfection!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did edit out the rust covered dwarf hollyhocks below the bird house that look like hot poop on a stick. Live and learn on that one!

      Delete
  9. Your photos and garden look great to me. Nevertheless, I agree with your conclusion (pithily expressed, I might add). How come Gomphrena grows so well for you but mine always looks pathetic? Huh?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gomphrena want lots of sun and moist well draining soil with a bit of fertilizer. I grow mine from seed so they're not treated with growth retardants. I wish you lived closer so I could share my extra seedlings with you. :o) I love that you used the word 'pithily'. Being direct and just saying what needs to be said is the best sometimes.

      Delete
    2. Being direct is best, unless you want to avoid telling the truth. Or lying. I also wish we lived closer! Think of all the plants we would exchange! And I would use 'pithily' at every opportunity.

      Delete
  10. We have come to believe that photographs tells the truth and are accurate, but they just aren't. I am always amazed at the difference I get from one setting to the next.
    I guess you must be back to school. A busy time I am sure!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Photos can lie, for sure! I've been back for 2 1/2 weeks but no one cried when they couldn't get their lockers open - neither teachers or students. ;o)

      Delete
  11. Oh my gosh, I'm dealing with this right now! Some areas of the garden or nature look so beautiful, but try as I might I just can't capture them on camera--and that's OK! Sometimes I dream, though, of a "camera" that could duplicate what I see when I blink my eyes. Wouldn't that be cool?! But your plants look beautiful and healthy as ever! Look for some blogger love in my next post--up today or tomorrow. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exciting! I've taken pic after pic to try to capture some areas of the garden and they're always pathetic. Seeing them in person is so much better. :o)

      Delete
  12. I'd much rather see warts and all. More alive somehow.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Replies
    1. I've seen gardens that are so perfect they look fake. It was pretty weird, actually.

      Delete
  14. Have you ever followed a professional photographer around? They take TONS of photos in order to get that one perfect shot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It took a lot of photos just to get that last shot!

      Delete
  15. I'd be really happy with that mass of Gomphrena outside my door, Tammy, regardless of the time of day! As to photos, I snap a lot and consign a healthy percentage to the trash. Even working within the so-called "golden hours" surrounding sunrise and sunset hasn't reliably produced the desired results. Photos under cloud cover are clearer but lack the sparkle that comes when you just happen to catch the light at the right angle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The light is never the same, at least not with my camera. But sometimes those amazing moments are so fleeting, I wish I could capture what I see.

      Delete
  16. My garden looks shameful right now - so bad I don't even want to take photos of it - all I can say is thank goodness for the fruit trees at least there is some colour in the apples.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a section of my garden I call the Dumpster Fire because it's such a wreck. I let one of my plants run loose and it took over, nearly suffocating several others. Another plant wasn't cut back and it fell over like a huge pile of spaghetti. But I've gone it and cleaned it up and need to keep a sharper eye on my beautiful thug next year.

      Delete
  17. To me your garden is very colorful, Tammy. The last photo is beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I went to hear a talk last night by a florist who owns a cut flower garden. She said that she is unable to get good enough photos of her beautiful flower garden and arrangements, so she pays a professional to take photos for her. Needless to say, most of the photos which accompanied her talk were superb, but the ones which really captured the history and soul of the place were taken by her or her family on a dull winter day, and were a little blurry. I suspect that if I were to ask everyone who attended the talk which photos they remember, these would certainly be among them. Sometimes perfection is simply not necessary.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some pictures are so perfect they feel a bit soulless. I like the ones that show the reality of a garden.

      Delete
  19. Your garden looks just right to me. As I get older I don't stress too much about everything looking good ALL the time. Take me as you find me is my new mantra....if you have a problem with that well then hustle on your way.

    ReplyDelete
  20. This post and the comments are a breath of fresh air to me. Sometimes I try too hard to take good photos, and then it's no longer enjoyable. So - what matters is the sharing. It's a wonderful community we're all part of. And that last photo is heart meltingly lovely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When writing about or photographing the garden start to feel like work, I stop. It's about feeling joy and peace not competition or perfection.

      Delete
  21. I do not like too neatly manicured gardens. They are for me on the show, and not for themselves. Everyone should have as it likes. Regards.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gardens that feel real are more appealing to me, too. :o)

      Delete
  22. I love photos where bloggers forget their wheelbarrows are showing. Their washing on the line, or a child' s toy or abandoned gardening glove. I love to see glimpses of everyday life. Our gardens not just sterile show pieces they are where we live. I don' t want to see perfection like in a magazine on a blog. I like to catch glimpses of blogging friends' personalities and everyday lives.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do, too. Blogs with photos that always look like a magazine spread make me a bit suspicious unless I know the gardener personally. Blogging is all about connecting with other people and photos that seem more real make the gardener more real.

      Delete
  23. Good point, Tammy. Too often I use close-ups, because they always turn out the best. But the longer shots--imperfections and all--really give a better idea of what our gardens look like. Besides the garden tools I forget to put away and the dog toys scattered here and there, there are always a few weeds in my photos as well:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just try for photos that don't include a pile of dog poop. ;o)

      Delete
  24. Hi Tammy, I freely admit to carefully selected close-ups when the light is a certain way or far-shots where the imperfections are too small to see. There are many areas of the garden that are too awful and embarassing to be put online.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a disaster area I'll be showcasing next week or so. Prepare to be horrified.

      Delete
  25. It took me a couple minutes to realize all the pictures were of the same grouping, angle and lighting sure do make a difference!
    Love the gomphrena. I grow the red and thought I as happy, but now the other colors are looking pretty good as well :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love every shade of gomphrena. :o) It's just such a cool plant.

      Delete
  26. So true ! I always use close ups or Macro when the garden needs weeding or mowing. Photography is so selective!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It can definitely be misleading. Sometimes we just have to set our pride aside and show everything, warts and all.

      Delete
  27. So true, so very, very true... And having just shared some very selective shots of my front garden, which is otherwise full of nasty surprises, thank you for making me smile so wryly! And that's a lovely combo by the way, whatever the lighting conditions...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome. I love that combo so much I'm planting it again next year. :o)

      Delete
  28. I got a new camera and can't wait to use it in the garden like you. However, it will take me all winter to figure out how to use it, and then I will probably reach for my old one without the brain. (I do video though.)
    Ray

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My camera is very basic but basic works well for me. I'm not much of a photographer. :o)

      Delete
  29. Tammy, you are a great photographer! Your posts are always entertaining and interesting. What's really bugging me is that, here it is 8 o'clock in the evening and it's dark already! How are we supposed to get good photos? Sheesh!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! The camera gets all the credit. :o) I actually took some pics in the semi-dark the other day and was shocked they turned out so well. I do miss the extra sunshine but what I really miss is rain!!

      Delete
  30. Your pics are lovely, especially the last one! I feel the same though, the camera can never portray what we actually see.xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wish we could take pictures with our eyes. Just blink and each amazing moment would be recorded on film. :o)

      Delete
    2. Gosh, what a wonderful thought, my father used to say, if you can think it, it will happen. Most sci-fi has materialised! I'm sure one day our eyes will record everything....make sure you are the first to patent it!!!

      Delete
  31. I have learned this year to see beyond the clutter, the weeds etc and see the beauty that is there...wonderful lesson for all of us Tammy!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I see beauty in all the tangled bushes in my garden because they not only have lovely flowers and leaves and cutie-pie plants but also houses bees and butterflies, crickets and what-nots. Unfortunately I can never capture that beauty through lens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A garden without wildlife isn't much of a garden to me. I'd rather see a messy garden full of life than a sterile plant museum.

      Delete
  33. That last comment really resonated with me, Tammy - I have a section of our walkway that is practically impassible because of a tangle of some huge, 3' tall blooms (that I have yet to identify - I'm sure you are not surprised by that ;) ) and every time I walk by it, I am amazed at the activity that I see all around it. My husbands request that I cut them back is going to have to wait until our first frost.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I fell off the Garden Blog ferris wheel 2 years ago (can't believe it's been that long), enticed by Instagram and Pinterest. On a whim I jumped back on the Blogosphere ride and started visiting my favorite Garden Bloggers. It was a thrill to see you still so active and creative as ever. I'll be blog surfing for hours, but it will be SO worth it! (Gardening is still natural rush, the photos just got put up on in a different part of the internet world...) ...now time to play catch up! - Shyrlene

    ReplyDelete
  35. Sometimes, you just document the area in a photo and don't worry about the light. Looks good though either way!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for visiting my blog! Feel free to comment on the posts or photos.